WATCH: Fast Lane Daily Compares a 2020 GT500 to the Classic 1967 Version

The 2020 GT500 was only unveiled just a few days ago, but already, out’s a smash hit; 10-second quarter-mile times, 760hp and new tech that has never been seen in a Mustang before. It’s been described as the perfect blend of American muscle and European-style performance. It’s been long-awaited and highly-speculated, but it’s finally here.

Several media outlets were invited to Las Vegas recently, to have a go in the latest Mustang to provide their reactions and thoughts for their respective audiences. One such outlet is The Fast Lane, where their crew not only climbed behind the wheel for the road course and drag strip, but were also able to get their hands on a 1967 version of the GT500.

Hey, with Shelby American headquarters a stones throw away from the drag strip, why not take advantage of the situation?

The two cars couldn’t be more different; the 2020 powered example comes to the table with a 5.2L, DOHC engine with a supercharger and VVT. The ’67, it’s rolling with a much more traditional OHV, “cam-in-block” design with 427 cubic-inches (7-liters if you were born after 1985). Like we’ve mentioned earlier, the 2002 cranks out 760 horses, but the ’67 is “only” making do with 350hp or so, and that’s the old-school “gross” rating.

Sitting behind the engine of the 2020, is a knob-style shifted DCT transmission with seven forward gears. In the 1967, a 4-speed manual with three separate pedals. Novel, but certainly antiquated by modern standards. If you look out back and underneath of the new car, you’ll find a independent rear suspension with 3.73 gears.

While the IRS has gotten a bad rap in earlier renditions of the Mustangs, the 2020 GT500 is definitely a big leap forward in terms of finding the perfect balance of strength, handling and being able to launch the car. Naturally, the ’67 car is old school solid rear axle, which is the time-honored favorite among the drag racers out there.

For more in-depth information on what it’s like to drive these tow cars, feel free to watch the attach video for more details.

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Rick Seitz

Rick Seitz is the owner and founder of AutoCentric Media, and has a true love and passion for all vehicles. When he isn’t tuning, testing, or competing with the brand’s current crop of project vehicles, he’s busy tinkering and planning the next modifications for his own cars.

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